How to win friends and influence people

Oh, Herb.

TRENDING: Cain: Black community ‘brainwashed’ into voting for Dems
By: CNN’s Kevin Liptak

“African-Americans have been brainwashed into not being open minded, not even considering a conservative point of view,” Godfather’s Pizza executive Herman Cain said on CNN’s “The Situation Room” in an interview airing Wednesday between 5-7 p.m. ET. “I have received some of that same vitriol simply because I am running for the Republican nomination as a conservative. So it’s just brainwashing and people not being open minded, pure and simple.”

Cain went on to explain that his interactions with African Americans led him to be optimistic about his own chances with the demographic.

“This whole notion that all African-Americans are not going to vote for Obama is not necessarily true,” Cain said.

He continued, “I believe a third [of African-Americans] would vote for me, based on my own anecdotal feedback. Not vote for me because I’m black but because of my policies.”

Guess who’s lapping this up.

More: As so often, Zandar was there before me.

Posted by YAFB on 09/29/11 at 08:25 AM • Permalink

Categories: PoliticsElection '12NuttersTeabaggeryOur Stupid MediaPoliblogsSkull Hampers

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Woe. You hear this “open-mindedness” trope from cons a lot. It resembles the “you aren’t tolerant if you don’t tolerate our intolerance” spiel.

Refusal to acknowledge the GOP’s increasingly blatant hostility to non-Caucasians: Check.

Assumption that African-Americans are just plain dumb: Check.

Concerted ignorance of how receptive African-American voters have been to this message from African-American GOPers in the past: Check.

Inability to use the English language as an effective communication tool:

This whole notion that all African-Americans are not going to vote for Obama is not necessarily true

Check.

Yes folks, Herman Cain is definitely a Republican!

Well I think Obama is going to win in a complete shutout and Doctor Who is the most popular show on television. This is not based on “evidence” or “ratings” or “polls”, but I do have a lot of anecdotal feedback from my lefty nerd friends.

Secondly, when you start acting like you, personally are somehow going to capture a percentage of the black vote that would represent oh, a thousand percent jump from where it currently is, you’re kind of implying that they’re going to do so because you’re black.  Especially since it ain’t going to be your fantastic sales pitch that they’re not open-minded.

And finally, I completely agree with Herman that “all African-Americans are not going to vote for Obama is not necessarily true.”  I also think they’re quite likely to vote overwhelmingly for Obama.

Call me cynical, but I believe Herman was intending his comments to be heard by the White Republican base.

Call me cynical, but I believe Herman was intending his comments to be heard by the White Republican base.

I believe it’s called a Unique Selling Proposition.

I agree that Cain’s comment really was for the white base, but to out-cynical you, so was the President’s fiery “Take off your slippers, put on marching shoes, stop complaining and get to work.” Which, for all of me, sounds like something he lifted from Rush’s show.

I agree that Cain’s comment really was for the white base, but to out-cynical you, so was the President’s fiery “Take off your slippers, put on marching shoes, stop complaining and get to work.” Which, for all of me, sounds like something he lifted from Rush’s show.

Huh? I’d introduce you to a clue, but I suspect it’d run away screaming.

Still, I guess I have to give it a go. You do realize that Obama actually addressed those comments to the CBC in person, where they were received as a rallying call?

I’d stick to the wacky biblical schtick. I doubt anybody here’ll be bothered to argue with you about that.

Well, it IS Herman Cain.  The same guy who claims he saw “no evidence of racism or racist signs” at Tea Party rallies….....

Still, I guess I have to give it a go. You do realize that Obama actually addressed those comments to the CBC in person, where they were received as a rallying call?

These parts I quoted were not, at least not by Maxine Waters, but it is admittedly me picking a few seconds sound bite out of a 25 minute rock-the-rafters speech (He even slapped the lectern as he strode away at the end). My comment had to do with wondering who he was playing to when he pictured blacks as shuffling around in their slippers complaining.

My comment had to do with wondering who he was playing to when he pictured blacks as shuffling around in their slippers complaining.

I believe he was making a contrast between idle grousing and productive activism, using metaphorical language I doubt was unfamiliar to the members of the CBC.

In some churches, the exhortation would be phrased as “Get up off your butts and down on your knees.”

Waters felt he was upbraiding Blacks for lack of political engagement, even though she’s done the same thing:

“We have got to show up. The Tea Party shows up. The Tea Party intimidates everybody,” she said. “We have to show people that we have no fear. Don’t mistake the silence for intimidation.”

I have a sneaking suspicion Waters felt he was upbraiding her.

As for channeling Rush, I suspect Rush would dissolve into incoherent and extremely noisy flatulence at the prospect of somebody actually successfully mobilizing sectors of the Black electorate.

Actually, it was more nuanced than that, and as usual, it was taken out of context. Maybe Ms. Waters was in the bathroom during this part of the speech:

Throughout our history, change has often come slowly.  Progress often takes time.  We take a step forward, sometimes we take two steps back.  Sometimes we get two steps forward and one step back.  But it’s never a straight line.  It’s never easy.  And I never promised easy.  Easy has never been promised to us.  But we’ve had faith.  We have had faith.  We’ve had that good kind of crazy that says, you can’t stop marching.  (Applause.)

Even when folks are hitting you over the head, you can’t stop marching.  Even when they’re turning the hoses on you, you can’t stop.  (Applause.)  Even when somebody fires you for speaking out, you can’t stop.  (Applause.)  Even when it looks like there’s no way, you find a way—you can’t stop.  (Applause.)  Through the mud and the muck and the driving rain, we don’t stop.  Because we know the rightness of our cause—widening the circle of opportunity, standing up for everybody’s opportunities, increasing each other’s prosperity.  We know our cause is just.  It’s a righteous cause.

So in the face of troopers and teargas, folks stood unafraid.  Led somebody like John Lewis to wake up after getting beaten within an inch of his life on Sunday—he wakes up on Monday:  We’re going to go march.  (Applause.)

Dr. King once said:  “Before we reach the majestic shores of the Promised Land, there is a frustrating and bewildering wilderness ahead.  We must still face prodigious hilltops of opposition and gigantic mountains of resistance.  But with patient and firm determination we will press on.”  (Applause.)

So I don’t know about you, CBC, but the future rewards those who press on.  (Applause.)  With patient and firm determination, I am going to press on for jobs.  (Applause.)  I’m going to press on for equality.  (Applause.)  I’m going to press on for the sake of our children.  (Applause.)  I’m going to press on for the sake of all those families who are struggling right now.  I don’t have time to feel sorry for myself.  I don’t have time to complain.  I am going to press on.  (Applause.)

I expect all of you to march with me and press on.  (Applause.)  Take off your bedroom slippers, put on your marching shoes.  Shake it off.  (Applause.)  Stop complaining, stop grumbling, stop crying.  We are going to press on.  We’ve got work to do, CBC.  (Applause.)

PBO also used the same phrase at another speech. 

http://pragmaticobotsunite.blogspot.com/2011/09/abou t-those-bedroom-slippers.html

As for Cain, yeah, that’s how you’re going to win African American Dems over, Cain.  Good luck with that.

In a world that grows increasingly Kafkaesque I feel moved to utter a simple truth.

Most Republicans like Herman Cain because of his philosophy, his message, his values, and the fact that he has extensive experience in the free enterprise system.

It’s really as simple as that.

When I listen to the inflammatory rhetoric of the Left and Right on TV and the Internet, I come away with the idea that Democrats are all to the left of Cindy Sheehan and Republicans all have a secret admiration for David Duke.

As absurd as this is, it is more characteristic of the surrealistic exponents of political ideas than in the ordinary Democrats and Republicans that one has friendships with on a daily basis.

Whole generations have now grown up who never once experienced segregation.  Corporations now have managers who are black as well as other races. We have had two black Secretaries of State, one of whom was head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff before.  We have black entertainment icons, our neighborhoods are integrated, our schools are integrated.

So is it any wonder that the relationship between the races has been ameliorated to a large degree?  Republicans are part of this same culture. Most of us are more interested in the ideas and values of another person than their race.

Now if someone wanted to suggest that racial differences still created a nuance of awkwardness, I would say that that would be an accurate statement. However, if what Republicans feel about blacks is racism, then racism clearly needs to be redefined.

What do Republicans feel about blacks Amherst?  Since you brought it up.

Most Republicans like Herman Cain because of his philosophy, his message, his values, and the fact that he has extensive experience in the free enterprise system.

Nobody here has disagreed with that.

(in fact, HTP stated it pretty clearly in the second comment.)

In a world that grows increasingly Kafkaesque I feel moved to utter a simple truth.

Most Republicans like Herman Cain because of his philosophy, his message, his values, and the fact that he has extensive experience in the free enterprise system.

I swear to God, I read down this far and thought “Amherst.”

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