There are worse things than forgetting.

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Via Gawker, here’s a candidate for the most crass corporate co-opting of 9/11 ever. With the exception of the event’s hostile takeover by Bush, Inc., of course.

As I was dropping my teenager off at school this morning, the radio announcer spoke the date, September 11th. The kiddo groaned, “Oh god, is it 9/11 today? That means we’ll have to watch boring movies and talk about 9/11 in every class. Again.”

She doesn’t remember 9/11, of course. She was a toddler at the time, and now she’s a lanky high schooler. 9/11 feels like a dim artifact of history to her, like the Kennedy assassination felt to us Gen Xers—an event that scarred our parents but was experienced by us kids as an iconic video. Maybe this is a good thing.

[X-posted at Balloon Juice]

Posted by Betty Cracker on 09/11/13 at 02:52 PM • Permalink

Categories: PoliticsBushCoWar In Error

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Crass.  Even well-meaning people tend to get weird about this anniversary.  A couple of years ago, while in Maine with some family members, a very nice woman, hearing that we were New Yorkers, asked us if we visited Ground Zero.  My uncle just sighed and told her, “I went to twenty six funerals in the months following the attack, I don’t want to visit the place where my friends died.”

Yeah, it gets weird, and people are still dying from the aftereffects of exposure to the resultant toxins.

I’ve spent over 400+ nights at Marriott properties over the last 3+ years. Coffee and muffins are always complementary. Even at the budget chain (Fairfield Inn). And they’re usually available until 10am along with a whole assortment of stale dry cereals, boxed scrambled eggs and sausage that put to rest question of whether sausage really is just lips and assholes or not. [Spoiler: it is.] I’m not even sure how this is a tribute.

Nothing quite says “NINELEVEN! NEVAR FORGET!” like handing out free mini-muffins for 30 minutes.

If you give out full size muffins the terr’ists win!

This is a sign posted inside the hotel, yes? If that’s so, it’s not likely the management was using it to try to drum up business. I’m going to take a charitable view and assume that someone at the front desk—or maybe even the person who takes care of the daily muffins—was remembering the day and posted an awkwardly-worded invitation for others to do the same.

If, on the other hand, I’m being too optimistic, I think we might do well not to use the memory of 9-11 to vilify our fellow Americans.

@QinaB - these hotels offer mini-muffins and coffee every damn day.  Tying it to a tragedy like 9/11 is pretty opportunistic but I’ll bet they do it every remembrance or holiday all year round.  The people who handle the marketing at these places have forgotten how to think with anything but the top 1/4 inch or so of their brains.  I wouldn’t villify their shallow brain thinking but I do think it’s worth pointing out because someone might see an opportunity to drill down a little for some kind of thought or emotion that goes a little deeper.

My favorite awkward hybrid of patriotic commemoration and consumerism was a sign at some fast-food joint about a month after the attacks reading “UNITED WE STAND. DIVIDED WE FALL. SOUP IS BACK!”

Thank goodness for soup!!  I’m actually not convinced that homemade soup is not the answer to all our problems.  Or at least until you’ve finished slurping it down and mellowed out with it for a bit.

Yeah, I am definitely pro-soup. Though, as a friend who was with me when we saw the sign plaintively asked, “Where did soup GO?”

It’s 9/12 now, but I think I want to chime in about the commercialization and co-opting of 9/11—almost none of the capitalist ventures cosigning to ‘Never forget, etc” tick me off like the Benghazi buzzards. And to the extent that we ignore the health of survivors (so many cancer/respiratory health concerns) and fail to discuss the why and wherefore of this kind of violence, I think we sort of haven’t learned anything. Which is a shame.

Can you imagine a jewish mom’s reaction to a lanky teenager, who expressed those views?

I say, it’s time to sit the kid down for a history lesson with some respect or reverence
that ONE DAY EVERYTHING CAN BE LOVELY AND THE NEXT DAY, YOUR FAMILY CAN BE BLOWN UP because of actions your country did 20 or 30 years ago, and how important it is to not make the same mistakes.

That my friend, is parenting.

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